Actup oral history project-baggageandbug.com -- ACT UP Oral History Project videotapes

But now, that lie was being extended beyond the arts to actual history. Instead, the dominant culture simply "came around. I know, I was there. I had seen no mainstream documentation, and that the knowledge of what we achieved was rapidly fading from public memory. Actually, what really took place was this: thousands of people, over many years, dedicated their lives to achieving a cultural and scientific transformation.

Actup oral history project

The purpose of this project is to ensure that their legacy remains and prokect properly recognized. The cruelty that we were subjected to, and how very very much alone we were. All of this legacy is fundamental to my participation in this project. Nesline, Michael. We have been deeply gratified by the overwhelmingly positive response from the community, but we still have over people waiting to be interviewed. This way, basic information on the many many areas of activity that made Actup oral history project ACT UP, its structure, strategies, subculture, its emotional style could all be articulated. It was completely self-defeating. To purchase video copies, please click on Ordering. Processing information Compiled by Donald MennerichRevised Watch free porn streaming videos online Marches16mm, color, sound, 8 min.

Ben cousins gay. Archives & Manuscripts

Vasina, Jan. How did I prepare for the interview? They talk in circles and tell fragments of the same story out of chronological sequence. Used to accurately record oral narratives, the inexpensive portable tape recorder helped democratize the gathering of history. Oral history has come of age and now commands a receptive, respectful audience. Write a thank-you note. Projject Cathedral". As a methodological balance to oral history, one can enlist other sources of data such as related artifacts, written documentation, and other interviews. Store the original in Actup oral history project separate place and Actup oral history project only the duplicate. Larry Indiana adult car seat law was asked to speak as part of a rotating speaker orwl, and his well-attended speech focused on action to fight AIDS.

Sarah Schulman was born in New York City in

  • The group works to improve the lives of people with AIDS through direct action , medical research, treatment and advocacy, and working to change legislation and public policies.
  • Leo Chiang and Tracy Wares.
  • We all have stories to tell, stories we have lived from the inside out.

Leo Chiang and Tracy Wares. These men and women of all races and classes have transformed entrenched cultural ideas about homosexuality, sexuality, illness, health care, civil rights, art, media, and the rights of patients.

They have achieved concrete changes in medical and scientific research, insurance, law, health care delivery, graphic design, and introduced new and effective methods for political organizing. These interviews reveal what has motivated them to action and how they have organized complex endeavors.

We hope that this information will de-mystify the process of making social change, remind us that change can be made, and help us understand how to do it. A complete transcript of each interview is available through free download via this website. You can also see streaming video clips of many of the interviews. Just click on Interviews. We are also grateful for the generous donation from our friend Philip Willkie. We have been deeply gratified by the overwhelmingly positive response from the community, but we still have over people waiting to be interviewed.

In order to do those interviews, we need your help. Your donation will help pay for hard drives and other computer equipment, software, transcriptions, and adding additional video clips to the website. In addition, we are always looking for significant help from individual donors and foundations and would be happy to talk to anyone with ideas. Please support the Project by making a donation now. Just click on the button that says "Make a Donation" and follow the instructions.

Thank you so much for your help and support. Click on the icons to link to our Facebook page and follow our tweets.

Part of the process is enjoyment and part of the adventure is learning from mistakes. Interview Tracking Form. Videotaping Local History. New York Times. What Is Oral History? Vazquez-Pacheco, Robert. The Pilot.

Actup oral history project

Actup oral history project

Actup oral history project

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Leo Chiang and Tracy Wares. These men and women of all races and classes have transformed entrenched cultural ideas about homosexuality, sexuality, illness, health care, civil rights, art, media, and the rights of patients. They have achieved concrete changes in medical and scientific research, insurance, law, health care delivery, graphic design, and introduced new and effective methods for political organizing. These interviews reveal what has motivated them to action and how they have organized complex endeavors.

We hope that this information will de-mystify the process of making social change, remind us that change can be made, and help us understand how to do it. A complete transcript of each interview is available through free download via this website. You can also see streaming video clips of many of the interviews.

Just click on Interviews. Be assured! As long as you are aware of the pitfalls, you will be fine. Proceed step-by-step, discover the problems, and work through to the solutions. At the end of an oral history project you will understand the oral historian's challenges from the inside-out, and you will forever after look at historical documents of any kind with a wider eye.

When in doubt, keep it simple. Part of the process is enjoyment and part of the adventure is learning from mistakes. Pinpointing Problems in Your Interview. Books About Oral History and Teaching. There are also many, many excellent books that use oral history interviews; the bibliographies in the above books offer some titles, and your librarian can probably suggest others.

American Folklore Society N. Step-by-Step Guide to Oral History. Oral History Links. What Is Oral History? Sequence for Oral History Research Formulate a central question or issue. Plan the project. Consider such things as end products, budget, publicity, evaluation, personnel, equipment, and time frames. Conduct background research. Process interviews. Evaluate research and interviews and cycle back to step 1 or go on to step 7. Store materials archivally.

Oral History Reminder List Decide your research goals and determine if oral history will help you reach them. You may find that your goals change. Do, however, focus. Conduct preliminary research using non-oral sources. Define your population sample. How will you select the people you will interview?

Assemble your equipment to fit your purposes. Research and choose the kind of recording that you need to produce and then choose your equipment. For example, does it need to be broadcast quality? Does it need a long life? What can you afford? Use an external microphone for better sound quality. This also applies to video. Test your equipment beforehand and get to know how it works under various conditions.

Practice using your equipment before you go to the real interview. If audio casssette taping, use sixty-minute tapes that screw together. Compile a list of topics or questions. Practice interviewing. Make a personalized checklist of things you must remember to do before, during, and after the interview. Verify your appointment a day or two before the interview. On the day of the interview, give yourself extra time to get there.

Interview and record in a quiet place. When setting up, listen for a moment. Make sure the interviewee understands the purpose of the interview and how you intend to use it.

This is not a private conversation. Start each recording with a statement of who, what, when, and where you are interviewing. Listen actively and intently.

Speak one at a time. Allow silence. Give the interviewee time to think. Silence will work for you. Ask one question at a time. Follow up your current question thoroughly before moving to the next. Usually ask questions open enough to get "essay" answers unless you are looking for specific short-answer "facts.

Wrap up the interview with lighter talk. Do not drop the interviewee abruptly after an intense interview. Be aware of and sensitive to the psychological forces at work during the interview. Limit interviews to about one to two hours in length, depending on the fatigue levels of you and your interviewee.

In general, don't count on photos to structure your interview, but you can use them as initial prompts. Carry large envelopes for borrowed and labeled artifacts such as photos. Label and number all recordings immediately. Have the interviewee sign the release form before you leave or send a transcript to the interviewee for correction before the release form is signed. After the interview, make field notes about the interview.

Write a thank-you note. Have a system to label and file everything. Do it. Copy borrowed photos immediately and return the originals.

Handle all photos by the edges and transport them protected by stiff cardboard in envelopes. Make photocopies for an interim record. Copy each interview tape. Store the original in a separate place and use only the duplicate. Transcribe or index the recordings. Assign accession numbers to recordings and transcripts. Make copies of all work. Store separately.

Analyze the interview. Verify facts. Did you get what you need? Go back for another interview if necessary. If you decide to, give the interviewee a copy of the recording or transcript. Ask for transcript corrections and a release form. Make provisions for long-term storage. In general, have a list of topics in mind, not specific questions, word-for-word, and not a specific sequence.

You may, however, want to have a start-up list of questions to get your interviewee and yourself comfortable before you change to your topic list.

Do plan the topic and form of your first substantial question after the "settling down" phase. Ask a question that will prompt a long answer and "get the subject going. Ask very personal or emotionally demanding questions after a rapport has developed. End as you began, not with bombshells, but gently with lighter questions. Ask questions one at a time. Allow silence to work for you.

Be a good listener, using body language such as looking at the interviewee, nodding, and smiling to encourage and give the message, "I am interested. Or you might say, "I don't understand. For example, ask a horseman what he means by the shaft of the buggy. How was it used? What was its purpose? Rephrase and re-ask an important question several times, if you must, to get the full amount of information the interviewee knows. Unless you want one-word answers, phrase your questions so that they can't be answered with a simple "yes" or "no.

Find out not only what the person did, but also what she thought and felt about what she did. Be flexible. Watch for and pick up on promising topics introduced by the interviewee, even if the topics are not on your interview guide sheet.

Life History Forms The life history form can contain very little or a great deal, depending on the project's purposes. Interview Tracking Form. Tracking Your Progress Depending on the project goals and archival plans, the paperwork can get quite involved or it can stay simple. Note of Encouragement At this point, some people feel overwhelmed.

Pinpointing Problems in Your Interview The interviewee This interviewee is not about to let you deviate from his script. For instance, a modest woman might not feel comfortable talking to a male about birth experiences.

The memories have a form other than linear time and you have to figure out how to allow the narrator to tell these memories in a way that makes sense to both teller and listener. The interviewer Were the people I interviewed the right ones for my research? How did I prepare for the interview?

Did I prepare enough? What did I use for equipment? Did it work satisfactorily? What changes should I make? What kinds of questions did I ask? What kinds of questions worked well? Not so well? Where did I conduct the interview?

What in the environment affected my interview? Did my subject want to talk? How did I encourage my subject to talk? What "masks" did my subject wear? Did my subject drop the masks? When did I tell my subject the purpose of the interview and how it would be used? Did my plans to use the interview seem to matter to the subject?

How accurate were my subject's memories? How accurate was my subject's reporting of her memories? How do I know? Does it matter? Who controlled the interview? How did I feel while interviewing? How did my subject feel while being interviewed?

Would it be useful and possible to return for another interview? Do I need to adjust my research design? When I transcribe, will I write exactly what was said or will I begin light editing right from the start? How will I decide what to write and what not to write?

How can I ensure that the transcription is accurate? How can I ensure that the transcription reports what the subject wanted to say? Who owns the interview and has the right to decide how the completed interview and transcription will be used? Next time, what would I do the same? What would I do differently? Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Baum, Willa K. Oral History for the Local Historical Society.

Transcribing and Editing Oral History. Brecher, Jeremy. Buckendorf, Madeline, and Laurie Mercier. Pamphlet Series 4. Albuqueque: Oral History Association, Dunaway, David K. Baum, eds. Oral History: An Interdisciplinary Anthology.

Gluck, Sherna Berger, and Daphne Patai, eds.

Sarah Schulman was born in New York City in Since , Sarah has been presenting her plays in mainstream theaters in New York and regionally. Active in the Palestine Solidarity Movement. Jim Hubbard has been making films since Along with James Wentzy, he made a 9-part cable access television series based on the Project. The 8-program series took place December , He lives with Nelson Gonzalez, his lover of 31 years, in New York.

Don't Do It! Shoot Art! Memento Mori , 16mm cinemascope, color, sound, 17 min. Two Marches , 16mm, color, sound, 8 min. The Dance , 16mm, color, sound, 8 min. A Valentine For Nelson , 16mm, color, sound, 5 min. Speak for Yourself , video, 30 min.

Elegy in the Streets , 16mm, color, silent, 30 min. My Father's Hotel , 16mm, color, silent, 5 min. Home , 16mm, color, silent, 11 min. March On! Stop the Movie Cruising , Super-8, color, silent, 14 min.

Actup oral history project

Actup oral history project