Illinois breast cancer statistics-Breast Cancer Statistics | CDC

Jump to navigation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention each year in the United States, about , cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women and about 2, in men. About 41, women and men in the U. In , Illinois reported 10, women diagnosed with breast cancer and 76 men. Also in 1, women died from breast cancer and 25 men.

Illinois breast cancer statistics

Illinois breast cancer statistics

In normal cells, these genes help prevent cancer by making proteins that help keep the cells from growing abnormally. Diagnostic bteast. Illinois breast cancer statistics can lower your risk of breast cancer by changing those risk factors that are under your control. Jump to Lowry teenie genie. Black women have a higher risk of death from breast cancer than white women.

Bald teen pusy. U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool

Cancel Continue. However, breast cancer IIllinois rates vary among different Asian ethnic groups in the U. This video external icon provides an overview cacner United States Cancer Statistics, the official federal cancer statistics. Minus Related Pages. Menu Link:. In general, developed countries such as the U. Also, see the top 10 cancers for men and women. Illinois breast cancer statistics Collection Data Use. Among women 50 and older, rates of DCIS increased from 7 cases perwomen in to 83 cases perwomen in [ ]. Hawaii has the lowest breast cancer mortality rate [ ]. Mortality Figure 1.

The Data Visualizations tool makes it easy for anyone to explore and use the latest official federal government cancer data from United States Cancer Statistics.

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  • This video external icon provides an overview of United States Cancer Statistics, the official federal cancer statistics.

That's the good news in a new study published Tuesday by the American Cancer Society. But cancer is still the second leading cause of death in America. And researchers estimate there will be about 1. That includes about 68, in Illinois, where breast cancer is expected to make up the highest number of the new cases , followed by lung cancer and prostate cancer. Illinois is expected to have the sixth-highest number of cancer diagnoses in among all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

California has the highest number of anticipated cases, with ,, while Wyoming has the fewest, at 2, Meanwhile, lung cancer is expected to cause the highest number deaths in our state, followed by colon cancer and pancreatic cancer.

Statewide, the study estimates 24, people will die of cancer in Many of the new cases across the country will involve the digestive system. There will be an estimated , new cancer cases involving the genital system, , involving female breasts and , involving the respiratory system.

For women, 50 percent of all new diagnoses are expected to be of breast, lung and colorectal cancers. Breast cancer alone will account for an estimated 30 percent of the new cases for women. Compared with the wealthiest counties, death rates in the poorest counties were twice as high for cervical cancer and 40 percent higher for male lung and liver cancers, the study found.

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The breast cancer mortality rate for Puerto Rico is 18 deaths per , women [ ]. Minus Related Pages. The program spotlights the life experiences and discoveries of women in research and aims to inspire the next generation of girls to pursue their dreams of a career in science. Breast cancer mortality over time Breast cancer mortality death rates in the U. A Cold or the Flu? After mammography was shown to be an effective breast cancer screening tool in the late s, the use of screening mammography in the U. Genes that contain the hereditary information passed down from parent to child serve as the blueprint for many human features and characteristics.

Illinois breast cancer statistics

Illinois breast cancer statistics

Illinois breast cancer statistics. U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool

The Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program offers free mammograms, breast exams, pelvic exams and Pap tests to eligible women. Even if a woman has already been diagnosed with cancer, she may receive free treatment if she qualifies. The program has been providing breast and cervical cancer screenings to the women of Illinois since Cervical cancer also is treatable if detected early. There are often no noticeable symptoms, so it is important that women get screened regularly and have a Pap test.

The test can find any abnormal changes that could turn into cancer. Illinois Diabetes Prevention and Control Program.

Hepatitis A Outbreaks. Infectious Disease Reporting Candida auris. About 41, women and men in the U. In , Illinois reported 10, women diagnosed with breast cancer and 76 men. Also in 1, women died from breast cancer and 25 men. Over the last decade, the risk of getting breast cancer has not changed for women overall, but the risk has increased for black women and Asian and Pacific Islander women. Black women have a higher risk of death from breast cancer than white women. The risk of getting breast cancer goes up with age.

In the United States, the average age when women are diagnosed with breast cancer is Men who get breast cancer are diagnosed usually between 60 and 70 years old. Studies have shown that your risk for breast cancer is due to a combination of factors. The main factors that influence your risk include being a woman and getting older. Many factors over the course of a lifetime can influence your breast cancer risk.

Although breast cancer screening cannot prevent breast cancer, it can help find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat. Talk to your doctor about which breast cancer screening tests are right for you, and when you should have them. Sometimes breast cells become abnormal. These abnormal cells grow, divide, and create new cells that the body does not need and that do not function normally. The extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are "benign" or not cancer.

These tumors usually stay in one spot in the breast and do not cause big health problems. Other tumors are "malignant" and are cancer. Breast cancer often starts out too small to be felt. As it grows, it can spread throughout the breast or to other parts of the body. This causes serious health problems and can cause death. Different people have different warning signs for breast cancer. Some people do not have any signs or symptoms at all. A person may find out they have breast cancer after a routine mammogram.

Keep in mind that some of these warning signs can happen with other conditions that are not cancer. One out of eight women will develop breast cancer over the course of a lifetime. Genes that contain the hereditary information passed down from parent to child serve as the blueprint for many human features and characteristics.

In normal cells, these genes help prevent cancer by making proteins that help keep the cells from growing abnormally.

If you have inherited a mutated copy of either gene from a parent, you have a high risk of developing breast cancer during your lifetime. Women with these inherited mutations also have an increased risk for developing other cancers, particularly ovarian cancer.

You can lower your risk of breast cancer by changing those risk factors that are under your control.

If you limit alcohol use, exercise regularly, and stay at a healthy weight, you are decreasing your risk of getting breast cancer. Women who choose to breastfeed for at least several months also may reduce their breast cancer risk.

Not using post-menopausal hormone therapy PHT also can help you avoid raising your risk. Early detection can help save lives. The Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program provides free mammograms and Pap tests for women who qualify - women age 35 to 64 and are uninsured. Younger women may qualify if they have symptoms. If breast cancer is diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the breast or to other parts of the body.

Breast cancer is treated in several ways. It depends on the kind of breast cancer and how far it has spread. Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biologic therapy, and radiation. It is common for doctors from different specialties to work together in treating breast cancer.

Surgeons are doctors that perform operations. Medical oncologists are doctors that treat cancers with medicines. Radiation oncologists are doctors that treat cancers with radiation.

68, New Cancer Cases Estimated In Illinois This Year | Across Illinois, IL Patch

Jump to navigation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention each year in the United States, about , cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women and about 2, in men. About 41, women and men in the U. In , Illinois reported 10, women diagnosed with breast cancer and 76 men. Also in 1, women died from breast cancer and 25 men. Over the last decade, the risk of getting breast cancer has not changed for women overall, but the risk has increased for black women and Asian and Pacific Islander women.

Black women have a higher risk of death from breast cancer than white women. The risk of getting breast cancer goes up with age. In the United States, the average age when women are diagnosed with breast cancer is Men who get breast cancer are diagnosed usually between 60 and 70 years old.

Studies have shown that your risk for breast cancer is due to a combination of factors. The main factors that influence your risk include being a woman and getting older.

Many factors over the course of a lifetime can influence your breast cancer risk. Although breast cancer screening cannot prevent breast cancer, it can help find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat.

Talk to your doctor about which breast cancer screening tests are right for you, and when you should have them. Sometimes breast cells become abnormal. These abnormal cells grow, divide, and create new cells that the body does not need and that do not function normally. The extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are "benign" or not cancer.

These tumors usually stay in one spot in the breast and do not cause big health problems. Other tumors are "malignant" and are cancer. Breast cancer often starts out too small to be felt.

As it grows, it can spread throughout the breast or to other parts of the body. This causes serious health problems and can cause death. Different people have different warning signs for breast cancer. Some people do not have any signs or symptoms at all. A person may find out they have breast cancer after a routine mammogram. Keep in mind that some of these warning signs can happen with other conditions that are not cancer.

One out of eight women will develop breast cancer over the course of a lifetime. Genes that contain the hereditary information passed down from parent to child serve as the blueprint for many human features and characteristics.

In normal cells, these genes help prevent cancer by making proteins that help keep the cells from growing abnormally. If you have inherited a mutated copy of either gene from a parent, you have a high risk of developing breast cancer during your lifetime. Women with these inherited mutations also have an increased risk for developing other cancers, particularly ovarian cancer. You can lower your risk of breast cancer by changing those risk factors that are under your control. If you limit alcohol use, exercise regularly, and stay at a healthy weight, you are decreasing your risk of getting breast cancer.

Women who choose to breastfeed for at least several months also may reduce their breast cancer risk. Not using post-menopausal hormone therapy PHT also can help you avoid raising your risk. Early detection can help save lives. The Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program provides free mammograms and Pap tests for women who qualify - women age 35 to 64 and are uninsured.

Younger women may qualify if they have symptoms. If breast cancer is diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the breast or to other parts of the body. Breast cancer is treated in several ways. It depends on the kind of breast cancer and how far it has spread. Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biologic therapy, and radiation. It is common for doctors from different specialties to work together in treating breast cancer.

Surgeons are doctors that perform operations. Medical oncologists are doctors that treat cancers with medicines. Radiation oncologists are doctors that treat cancers with radiation. Illinois Diabetes Prevention and Control Program. Hepatitis A Outbreaks. Infectious Disease Reporting Candida auris.

A Cold or the Flu? Methane in Groundwater. Veterans' Homes. Translated Documents. Data Collection Data Use. Proposed Rules. Breast Cancer According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention each year in the United States, about , cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women and about 2, in men. What is breast cancer? What are the symptoms of breast cancer? Some warning signs of breast cancer are— new lump in or near the breast or under the arm thickening or swelling of part of the breast irritation or dimpling of breast skin redness or flaky skin in the nipple area or the breast pulling in of the nipple or pain in the nipple area nipple discharge other than breast milk that occurs without squeezing any change in the size or the shape of the breast pain in any area of the breast Keep in mind that some of these warning signs can happen with other conditions that are not cancer.

What are the risk factors for developing breast cancer? What does it mean to have a genetic predisposition to breast cancer? Can breast cancer be prevented? How can breast cancer be found early? Where can I find financial help to get a mammogram? How is breast cancer diagnosed? Doctors often use additional tests to find or diagnose breast cancer. Breast ultrasound. A machine uses sound waves to make detailed pictures, called sonograms, of areas inside the breast.

Diagnostic mammogram. If you have a problem in your breast, such as lumps, or if an area of the breast looks abnormal on a screening mammogram, doctors may have you get a diagnostic mammogram. Magnetic resonance imaging MRI. A kind of body scan that uses a magnet linked to a computer.

The MRI scan will make detailed pictures of areas inside the breast. There are different kinds of biopsies for example, fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, or open biopsy. How is breast cancer treated? An operation where doctors cut out and remove cancer tissue. Using special medicines, or drugs to shrink or kill the cancer. The drugs can be pills you take or medicines given through an intravenous IV tube, or, sometimes, both.

Hormonal therapy. Some cancers need certain hormones to grow. Hormonal treatment is used to block cancer cells from getting the hormones they need to grow.

Biological therapy. This treatment works with your body's immune system to help it fight cancer or to control side effects from other cancer treatments. Side effects are how your body reacts to drugs or other treatments. Biological therapy is different from chemotherapy, which attacks cancer cells directly.

The use of high-energy rays similar to X-rays to kill the cancer cells. The rays are aimed at the part of the body where the cancer is located. Menu Link:. Diseases A-Z. Protecting health, improving lives.

Illinois breast cancer statistics

Illinois breast cancer statistics