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Scandel nude photos

Scandel nude photos

Scandel nude photos

Subscribe to Independent Premium. Had Scandel nude photos occurred to her? Though it might sound precious, or even melodramatic, to an outsider, it is no exaggeration to say that culture is everything in the Marine Corps. Judy, meanwhile, continues to work among the same Marines who posted about her on Free fifties nude women. As Brennan reported Scandel nude photos story, he spoke often to Anna Hiatt. Only ninety minutes after his ndue request, a photo showing Judy topless was posted to the Facebook thread. He had a vague notion that he wanted to tell Sxandel people's stories. In the months to come, I pitched phoots a few bucks to the Kickstarter campaign for The War Horse, but I couldn't help noticing that the funding thermometer on its website remained stuck at arctic lows. Cover image: Rep.

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Lawyer Marty Singer said that he sent Google over a dozen requests on behalf SScandel unnamed celebrities to remove images before taking further Digimon rika nonaka. So I wanted to be in the infantry. Once he explained everything, the line went silent until Melinda said, "You have another chance to find a purpose. McDonel, she noted, was "standing close enough to smell my perfume. Robert Neller, commandant of the Marine Corps. Thomas Brennan, Scandel nude photos journalist and former Marine who broke the story. If I see someone pull a phone, I get out of line. His Scandwl, Melinda, was at work. At in the morning on February 21, five days after McDonel stalked Judy, Brennan Scandel nude photos home in his pickup ndue and drove up I to Washington. The year-old singer took to her Abbie Tolentino Scandal Part 2. The topless photograph was greeted by some members of Marines United with Scandel nude photos Scandeo job gents! Similarly, the racism and drug problems of the post-Vietnam military took nearly a decade to uproot, and eventually led to the creation of an all-volunteer force.

New Marine Corps survey data could give leaders a glimpse into whether women and others feel protected from discrimination two years after a nude-photo scandal exposed the way some men were mistreating their female colleagues.

  • In the magazine, the year-old Oscar winner broke her silence for the first time on her nude photos:.
  • It was a little past ten o'clock, and the weather outside was clear and gusty, typical of winters among the sand pines of coastal North Carolina.
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New Marine Corps survey data could give leaders a glimpse into whether women and others feel protected from discrimination two years after a nude-photo scandal exposed the way some men were mistreating their female colleagues. Marines across the ranks said their service is no better or worse than those in the civilian job sector at dealing with issues such as gender relations, freedom from harassment, discrimination and fair performance evaluation.

In , top Marine Corps leaders were forced to address a troubling report about a group called Marines United that shared photos of female troops online without their permission.

The scandal highlighted a disturbing trend of female Marines being disrespected by men in the ranks. Hogan stressed that the survey doesn't offer a full glimpse into the command climate across the Marine Corps, but rather a snapshot of how Marines feel about certain issues at a given point in time and in their careers. But it could indicate that Marines don't feel leaders are doing any better than anyone else when it comes to combating the problems, despite years of reforms.

Following the scandal, the Corps created a task force to identify gender-related problems leading to a breakdown in unit cohesion or good order. One year's worth of data from the Exit and Milestone Longitudinal Survey isn't going to affect policy change.

Hogan said it'll take at least three years of survey data to establish a trend. Since fiscal was the first time Marines completed the new survey, she said the data was "very preliminary.

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Brennan said that Neller thanked him and told him that sometimes it takes an outsider to show the organization where it's coming up short. But the scale and sophistication of the Marines United collection were unlike anything he'd ever encountered. You can do something good. I want to deploy. Marines like him, he added, "are going to do dumb things.

Scandel nude photos

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United States Armed Forces nude photo scandal - Wikipedia

It was a little past ten o'clock, and the weather outside was clear and gusty, typical of winters among the sand pines of coastal North Carolina. The woman—call her Judy—was checking into a new unit. She'd come to CIF to collect her standard issue of combat equipment. While Judy stood among the rows of stacked body armor, Kevlar helmets, and camouflage hiking packs, an infantryman named Brenden McDonel, who was standing a few places behind her in line, pulled out his phone and started surreptitiously taking her photograph.

McDonel didn't know Judy, but that didn't keep him from posting the pictures to a private Facebook group called Marines United. Within minutes of that first post, dozens of members of Marines United chimed in. Others suggested sexual acts. And throat. And ears. Both of them.

Video it though. As they advanced through the line, McDonel continued to stalk Judy, shooting photos and posting them to Marines United. Only ninety minutes after his initial request, a photo showing Judy topless was posted to the Facebook thread. The picture had clearly been taken by a lover, someone she had trusted. But its appearance on Marines United represented an obvious breach of that trust. The topless photograph was greeted by some members of Marines United with applause "Great job gents!

Still others expressed a muted dismay "Some of you guys are creepy as fuck". Thomas Brennan, a thirty-one-year-old investigative journalist and former Marine, was disgusted but not surprised. For weeks he had been tracking Marines United, watching as the group, which had been organized as a suicide-prevention and support network for veterans, was transformed into a forum for revenge porn.

In the course of his reporting, he discovered that members of the all-male group had crowdsourced thousands of images of hundreds of naked servicewomen. The pictures included selfies, creepshots, and intimate photos.

Like the pictures at the heart of the celebrity-photo scandals on 4chan and Reddit, the images were being posted without their subjects' knowledge or consent.

Here, however, they were being deployed to intimidate women in the Marine Corps. When we met at his house earlier this year, he told me that he had seen isolated images of naked female service members on military-oriented Facebook pages before.

But the scale and sophistication of the Marines United collection were unlike anything he'd ever encountered. Brennan joined the group, he told me, to get the word out about stories he was writing for The War Horse, a military-news nonprofit that he'd recently founded. On January 30 of this year, he was scrolling through his Facebook feed on his phone when he came across a link posted to Marines United by an account that belonged to Joseph Bundt, who identified himself as a former Marine.

When Brennan clicked the link, he saw that it led to a shared Google Drive folder containing thousands of images of naked women from every branch of the military. The photographs were indexed by name, which meant that the Google Drive was effectively a searchable image database. Reached by phone, the owner of Bundt's accounts denied that he had posted the photographs to the Google Drive or the link to Facebook. He said his accounts had been hacked, and declined to comment on other details of the incident.

They were weaponizing this stuff. Brennan took screenshots of the hundreds of likes and comments that followed the link to the Google Drive, as well as of subsequent posts that encouraged others to add to the photo collection.

Within twelve hours of the first post, the number of folders on the Google Drive had ballooned from four to fifty. Brennan told me that members of Marines United were operating "like a company-level intelligence- collection team," gathering images using tactics similar to the ones that had helped Marines investigate insurgent networks in Afghanistan and Iraq.

As he watched the photo scandal unfold in real time, Brennan called Major Kendra Motz, a public- affairs officer at Camp Lejeune who had helped him with a story he'd written for Vanity Fair. Motz recognized the significance of what Brennan had found. At Brennan's request, the information he passed along was recorded as an anonymous tip.

In an email, Carpenter updated several senior field-grade and general officers on the situation. He wrote that he had registered a complaint with the company that employed, through a subcontractor, a member of Marines United. But he also noted that the group remained active on Facebook, and that the offending thread had been deleted before he could gather "enough information about the group or group members to link individuals or the group to inappropriate actions.

To his surprise, she said no. Brennan's house is in Onslow County, a thirty-minute drive from the front gate of Camp Lejeune, where he was stationed before he was medically retired from the Corps in A modest three-bedroom with a Marine Corps flag out front, it is nestled in a cul-de-sac among dozens of identical vinyl-sided homes.

When I visited him this spring, his daughter, who is in grade school, had left her books and toys scattered across the living room. His wife, Melinda, was at work. Zeus, his Great Dane, drooled on my lap, and Cupcake, his epileptic pit bull, whined by the front door. Strewn across the kitchen counter were stacks of papers, a laptop, and a four-inch-thick black binder in which he kept the screenshots from Marines United.

After the Facebook posts and shared Google folders were deleted, the binder became the only known record of the incident. I first met Brennan in , when I was a twenty-four-year-old second lieutenant and he was a nineteen-year-old private first class. We were both infantrymen, fresh out of training and bound for our first combat deployments in Iraq. Although I didn't know Brennan well at the time, his platoon was led by one of my best friends.

I ran into Brennan again a decade later, in New York, where he was living while studying at Columbia Journalism School. I was drinking one night at the Half King, a Manhattan bar co-owned by the writer Sebastian Junger, when a guy with a face full of stubble and tattoos climbing up his arms tapped me on the shoulder.

I didn't recognize Brennan until he said that he'd been in my friend's platoon. Standing there among the sticky wooden tables, we exchanged gossip about Marines we both knew—"Did you hear Esquibel got his foot blown off in Helmand? In the months to come, I pitched in a few bucks to the Kickstarter campaign for The War Horse, but I couldn't help noticing that the funding thermometer on its website remained stuck at arctic lows.

At the Half King, Brennan never mentioned that he couldn't afford to bring his wife and their daughter to live with him in New York. Nor did he say much about the combat injury that ultimately ended his career in the Marines.

But when we met this spring, he told me about the rocket-propelled grenade that had exploded a few feet from his head in , during an ambush in a wisp of a town called Musa Qala, in Afghanistan's Helmand Province. The injury caused memory loss and mood swings. Military doctors eventually diagnosed him with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

While on leave and awaiting his mandatory medical retirement from the Corps, Brennan started a job as a newspaper reporter in Lumberton, North Carolina, a hundred miles from his house. He had a vague notion that he wanted to tell other people's stories. Every Monday morning, he left Melinda and their daughter to spend the workweek at a studio apartment he was renting in Lumberton. The job was unsatisfying, and Brennan's imminent discharge left him feeling that his true purpose—to make a career as a Marine—had been snatched from under him.

By late , Brennan had had enough. Three days after Christmas and two days before the end of his military career, he was at his apartment in Lumberton when he decided to write Melinda a letter.

I deserve every bit of sorrow I feel. Never forget how much I love you and cherish the times we spent together. His thoughts turned to his daughter.

He imagined her growing up without him, and what it would be like for her to find out that her father had quit on himself. The vision was enough to change his mind. He rushed to the toilet, pushed his fingers down his throat, and vomited up dozens of little white pills. Before driving himself to the local hospital, he stood staring at his phone. Eventually he summoned the nerve. Once he explained everything, the line went silent until Melinda said, "You have another chance to find a purpose.

After his suicide attempt, Brennan quit his job in Lumberton and found a position closer to home, at the Jacksonville Daily News. At Melinda's urging, he left North Carolina in to attend Columbia. He returned home to Jacksonville after finishing his journalism degree and turned his full attention to The War Horse.

In February of this year, not long after he discovered the cache of Marines United photographs, Brennan called Anna Hiatt, an adjunct professor at Columbia. Hiatt had supported Brennan's vision for The War Horse, even agreeing to serve as its editor, and now she encouraged him to write about the photos as a journalist.

But his first instinct wasn't to write about it. That idea felt like a break from the tribe. Motz, too, encouraged him to write about the photos. She thanked him and asked to be left alone. Savannah Cunningham, a twenty-year-old from Phoenix, wasn't even a Marine at the time she was harassed. She was a poolee, a civilian who had signed enlistment papers but had yet to attend recruit training.

The Marines declined to make her available for an interview. As Brennan reported his story, he spoke often to Anna Hiatt. What he kept saying was, 'Guys I know are probably going to come after me,' which I didn't really believe. Brennan presented them with the binder of screenshots. Journalistic due diligence was part of the reason, but he also feared that the organization, one he cared deeply about, wasn't prepared for the fallout. Still, Brennan told me, "the scariest part was that there was no recourse for victims of this type of harassment.

Amos, the Marine commandant at the time, about online sexual harassment. In his response, Amos wrote that "the anonymous nature of social media, the use of online pseudonyms, and the magnitude of available sites presents key challenges to curtailing inappropriate postings.

Through his reporting, Brennan had compiled the online profiles and identities of forty-nine Marines who had shared photos through the Google Drive and Marines United.

Three quarters of the participants were or had been commissioned or noncommissioned officers, including three drill instructors, one recruiter, a major who served as a fighter pilot, and a former member of HMX-1, the helicopter squadron that flies the president. At Camp Lejeune, Brennan again pressed the Corps to initiate an investigation, and he asked it to confirm the names he'd provided.

Scandel nude photos

Scandel nude photos