Recording menstrual cycles-Menstrual Cycle Tracking - Practical Apps

All women, even those with irregular cycles, can rely on Flo. Log your period days in a handy calendar, schedule menstrual cycle reminders, record moods and pms symptoms, and take full control of your health. Wondering when you had your last period? Want to know when your next period is coming? Updated September 17,

Recording menstrual cycles

Medical News Today have tried and tested apps galore to bring you a selection of the top 10 apps to start tracking your period today. Women track to: 1 be aware of how their body is doing, 2 understand their body's Recording menstrual cycles to different phases of their cycle, 3 be prepared, 4 become pregnant, and 5 inform conversations with healthcare providers. Supplementary Material 1 - Demographics Click here to view. Visit www. Progesterone has a thermogenic effect so its levels can be tracked by measuring BBT.

Mccarhty naked. Read this next

Female Recording menstrual cycles odour is a potential cue to ovulation. Attractiveness of women's body odors over the menstrual cycle: the role of oral contraceptives and receiver sex. In his class, male students are in the significant minority with just 13 mensrrual compared with 30 girls. Br Med J. You can find other styles of printable menstrual charts, electronic calendars you can fill in online, electronic next period calculators, and smart phone menstrual tracker apps. External link. Violence against women Abuse during childbirth Domestic violence Intimate partner violence Misogyny Cycpes harassment Sexual assault Rape Femicide Gender discrimination. Women seeking a short-term partner demonstrate a preference for taller and muscular males. Chhaupadi is a social practice that occurs in the western part of Nepal for Hindu women, which prohibits a woman from participating Recording menstrual cycles everyday activities during menstruation. The unique impact of menstruation on the female voice: Implications for the evolution of Sexiest nicknames cycle cues. Such products include sanitary napkins and tampons which are disposable ; cloth menstrual pad and menstrual cups which are reusable. Divide the circumference into the number of days in your cycle for that month, then join the divisions with Recording menstrual cycles to the centre. Am Fam Physician.

We turn to our patient, see the worry on her face and begin to ask questions about an inherently personal topic: her menstruation.

  • Keeping track of your periods is a good idea.
  • In his class, male students are in the significant minority with just 13 boys compared with 30 girls.

Keeping track of your periods is a good idea. But did you realize keeping track of your periods can also give you important information about your health? The first question your health care provider will likely ask you is when was the first day of your last menstrual period or LMP. This will be an easy question to answer accurately if you have been keeping track of your menstrual cycles. It is very helpful if you have recorded the length of your menstrual cycles, the amount of blood flow you experience, any bleeding in between your periods, and any symptoms you may have.

You can use any type of calendar to track your menstrual cycle. You need to make sure whatever type of calendar you are using has enough space for you to make notes. You will be recording the days you have your period and any physical or emotional symptoms that you experience during your menstrual cycle.

You may prefer to use an app consider Clue or Period Tracker Lite to track your menstrual cycle. Sign up for our Health Tip of the Day newsletter, and receive daily tips that will help you live your healthiest life.

Everything about your period says something about your health, including:. At your regular yearly physical your healthcare provider will ask you about your periods. Mark down the first day of your period. You will also want to make a mark on each day until your period stops. Also, indicate on your calendar if bleeding is exceptionally light or heavy. Describe the bleeding. The amount and quality of your bleeding are as important as how long and how often you bleed.

Be sure to note a description of your bleeding each day. Consider these descriptions: Heavy, light or just spotting Dark brown or bright red Clots or watery flow Record how you feel. Has your day gone along easily without any major problems? Make note of that! Has today been one of those off days when you haven't felt like yourself? Be sure to note any symptoms or problems you experience each day.

Have you felt anxious or depressed? Were you bloated today? Did you have a headache or any other pain?

Are you having very painful menstrual cramps? Rate your day. Use a scale of from 1 to 10 to rate your days. Rate your worst possible day with the number 1 and use the number 10 when you have your best possible days—days when you feel completely healthy and happy. Take time every day to rate your day—even if all your days are 10s! Keep track of medications. It is important that you write down any medications that you take during your period.

If you occasionally take any over the counter or prescribed drugs to treat your period pain or other symptoms, write them down on the appropriate day. The same is true for any supplements or herbal remedies. This is particularly useful when side effects or drug interactions develop. Was this page helpful? Thanks for your feedback! Sign Up. What are your concerns? Continue Reading.

Tracking the color of your period can tell you about your health. Polymenorrhea and Abnormal Uterine Bleeding. A Girl's Guide to Irregular Periods. What to Know about Seeing a Doctor for Cramps. An Overview of Menstruation. How to Make a Menstrual Cycle Calendar. Verywell Health uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using Verywell Health, you accept our.

Science and the Paranormal: Probing the Existence of the Supernatural. Daly N, Warren P. Archived from the original on 15 October Use a notebook or calendar to note symptoms on certain dates. The evolved psychology of voice: evaluating interrelationships in listeners' assessments of the size, masculinity, and attractiveness of unseen speakers. Overview The rhythm method, also called the calendar method or the calendar rhythm method, is a form of natural family planning. Also, the rhythm method doesn't protect you from sexually transmitted infections.

Recording menstrual cycles

Recording menstrual cycles

Recording menstrual cycles

Recording menstrual cycles

Recording menstrual cycles

Recording menstrual cycles. Step 3 The Moon.

At your regular yearly physical your healthcare provider will ask you about your periods. Mark down the first day of your period. You will also want to make a mark on each day until your period stops. Also, indicate on your calendar if bleeding is exceptionally light or heavy. Describe the bleeding. The amount and quality of your bleeding are as important as how long and how often you bleed. Be sure to note a description of your bleeding each day.

Consider these descriptions: Heavy, light or just spotting Dark brown or bright red Clots or watery flow Record how you feel. Has your day gone along easily without any major problems? Make note of that!

Has today been one of those off days when you haven't felt like yourself? Be sure to note any symptoms or problems you experience each day. Have you felt anxious or depressed? Were you bloated today?

Did you have a headache or any other pain? Are you having very painful menstrual cramps? Rate your day. Use a scale of from 1 to 10 to rate your days. Rate your worst possible day with the number 1 and use the number 10 when you have your best possible days—days when you feel completely healthy and happy. Take time every day to rate your day—even if all your days are 10s!

Keep track of medications. It is important that you write down any medications that you take during your period. If you occasionally take any over the counter or prescribed drugs to treat your period pain or other symptoms, write them down on the appropriate day. The same is true for any supplements or herbal remedies.

If you are trying to keep track of your periods to plan your schedule, figure out the best days to conceive , or for other reasons, keeping a menstrual cycle chart will help you do this. Charting your cycle can be as simple as marking off the days of your bleeding on a calendar, or you can download and use this printable menstrual chart. This printable chart is easy to use and maintain. You can record and view 12 months of periods on one chart.

You can also use the chart to help you track your fertile days, when your next period is due, and the length of each cycle. Follow this guide if you need help using Adobe to download a printable PDF file.

Menstrual Cycle Basics – Your Period

We consider why and how women track their menstrual cycles, examining their experiences to uncover design opportunities and extend the field's understanding of personal informatics tools. To understand menstrual cycle tracking practices, we collected and analyzed data from three sources: 2, reviews of popular menstrual tracking apps, a survey of people, and follow-up interviews with 12 survey respondents.

We find that women track their menstrual cycle for varied reasons that include remembering and predicting their period as well as informing conversations with healthcare providers. Participants described six methods of tracking their menstrual cycles, including use of technology, awareness of their premenstrual physiological states, and simply remembering. Although women find apps and calendars helpful, these methods are ineffective when predictions of future menstrual cycles are inaccurate.

Designs can create feelings of exclusion for gender and sexual minorities. Our findings encourage expanding the field's conceptions of personal informatics. Personal tracking for self-knowledge is commonplace, from recording finances for accountability to tracking location for pure curiosity. However, relatively little attention has been paid to tracking factors specific to women's health 1 , including where a woman is in her menstrual cycle.

When Apple HealthKit launched in without support for menstrual data, the public was outraged over the exclusion of such an essential aspect of health tracking [ 11 ]. Apple later added this feature, but its exclusion sparked a conversation about inclusivity in design of personal tracking tools [ 33 ]. We consider menstrual tracking through the lens of personal informatics, with two goals. We first contribute to an ongoing conversation on women's health in HCI e.

We offer an understanding of why and how women track their menstrual cycles, focusing on how they use technology to do so. Second, we identify design challenges and concerns in digital tools for menstrual cycle tracking, drawing upon such insights to offer guidance and challenge current broader assumptions in the design of personal informatics tools.

Although not about tracking a behavior, menstrual cycle tracking fits Li et al. The practice of menstrual cycle tracking challenges many assumptions of personal informatics. For example, women often track their menstrual cycles without an explicit goal of action, but instead for awareness of their place in their menstrual cycle.

Understanding the differences and commonalities between menstrual cycle tracking and other domains of personal informatics extends how we as a field consider personal informatics and design our personal informatics tools.

Toward these goals, we collected and analyzed data from three sources. We first collected and coded 2, reviews of popular menstrual tracking apps on the iPhone App Store and Android Market. We then surveyed people to understand their practices around tracking menstrual cycles.

We finally conducted follow-up interviews with 12 survey respondents to gather in-depth perspectives of those practices. An empirical description of why women track their menstrual cycles. These practices differ from the traditional personal informatics focus on tracking one's behavior, rather than one's experiences. An understanding of how women track their menstrual cycles. We identify six common methods: using dedicated apps, recording in digital calendars, using paper calendars or diaries, following birth control intakes or schedules, noticing early bodily symptoms, and simply remembering.

A discussion of problems and issues associated with menstrual cycle tracking. We specifically consider concerns about the indiscrete nature of tracking, inclusivity, and varied and evolving use cases for the same tool. We then discuss the broader implications of our findings for personal informatics, considering how the design of personal informatics tools can be informed by problems and issues women commonly encounter in menstrual cycle tracking.

The study of menstrual cycle tracking builds on prior research in technology for women's health and personal tracking. Women often turn to web searches, apps, and social media during pregnancy and parenting for information on whether their experience is normal [ 13 , 23 , 28 ].

Many turn to social networks for support, information, and often commiseration [ 28 , 29 , 37 ]. HCI has further considered designs for technology supporting pregnancy and motherhood, including rethinking the experience of breastfeeding [ 4 , 10 ] and aiding in tracking child development [ 22 , 39 ].

Peyton et al. Prior research often focuses on maternal health. Designing and understanding technology for broader women's health has received relatively limited attention [ 1 ]. One design in the space is Labella, underwear with a visual marker and an app designed to help women explore their vaginal and pelvic region with a goal of breaking social taboos and promoting exploration and self-understanding [ 2 ]. Another is Help Pinky, a digital game aimed to bridge knowledge about menstruation and puberty in a rural Indian community with limited support and knowledge [ 18 ].

Work by Stawarz et al. They suggest that current pill reminder apps, including birth control apps, fail to effectively address forgetfulness, and that apps do not always integrate into people's varied routines. Many design explorations of women's health technology have taken a feminist HCI approach [ 2 , 10 ], which stresses engaging with the perspectives of marginalized groups that are typically left out of the design process.

In our work, we highlight ways in which tracking apps fail to support the marginalized populations of gender and sexual minorities. We adopt many aspects of Bardzell and Bardzell's Feminist HCI methodology [ 6 ], such as indicating our goals as technologists in our interactions with participants.

However, our research team's expertise is in personal informatics technology, rather than feminist theory. We therefore primarily approach this study through the lens of personal informatics, offering design insights for future tools.

Although we do not connect our findings to feminist theory, we acknowledge the opportunity for considering personal informatics design through a feminist lens.

Li et al. Early models of personal informatics describe how people use technologies to collect and integrate data toward then acting on the collected data, typically with a goal of behavior change. However, personal tracking technology is now a part of people's everyday lives and is not necessarily associated with a self-improvement goal [ 35 ]. People track for other motivations, including pure curiosity and a desire to instrument a particular activity [ 12 ].

In this paper, we consider the everyday life experiences of menstrual cycle tracking to understand people's varied motivations, uses, and goals. Personal informatics research has often investigated health and wellness by developing or studying digital tools to help people track and understand personal data.

However, people also use other means to track their health. Digital systems for personal tracking offer benefits over paper systems, including improving accuracy and ease of entry while maintaining usability [ 43 ].

However, digital tools still sometimes fail to support people's needs or goals, and tracking on paper is still prolific. As shown in research on personal financial tracking, paper systems people use for personal tracking may or may not resemble digital methods [ 21 ]. Women similarly use a variety of methods to track their menstrual cycles, from digital to memory-based.

A few studies have explored personal tracking in the context of sex and pregnancy. Lupton highlights self-quantifying components of apps for tracking sex performance e.

Apps for tracking pregnancy often offer information on how the fetus should be developing and provide reassurance and advice about parenting [ 28 ]. Many apps for tracking pregnancy focus on associated risks, while others highlight associated joys [ 41 ].

However, little research focuses on examining the needs and challenges of menstrual cycle tracking. We gathered data from three sources: online app reviews, a survey of women's tracking practices, and follow-up interviews with some survey participants.

Table 1 summarizes participant demographics. We collected data from three sources: app store reviews, a survey of women's practices, and follow-up interviews.

We wanted to determine what characteristics of specific apps people like or dislike, rather than general opinions of the apps themselves. We therefore focused on open-ended review text, ignoring review scores.

We analyzed review data through a grounded approach. One of the researchers who defined the codes broke any ties. After analyzing the app reviews, we designed a survey to address open questions about why and how women track. The survey first asked people whether or how they monitor their menstrual cycle. For those who currently or previously tracked, we asked primarily open-ended questions to understand how people track their menstrual cycle and what they like and dislike about their method.

We obtained IRB approval for this study from our university as minimal risk research with a waiver of parental consent, because requiring parental consent would impact the ability to conduct the research and could increase risk of participation e. Adults granted consent after reading a description of the study. Minors assented to participation after reading a similar description adjusted for a grade school reading level. We recruited survey respondents via posts to Facebook, Twitter, and a Reddit subreddit targeted at teenagers.

Three researchers first read the open-ended survey responses and discussed potential codes. We aimed for diversity in experiences and backgrounds including race, gender, sexual minorities, and health conditions rather than representativeness. Two researchers conducted each interview via phone or Skype, with one leading the interview and the other taking notes and asking follow-up questions.

An external service transcribed the interviews. The researchers discussed major themes and identified 10 codes. We did not conduct inter-rater reliability on the interview data. It is rarely calculated on semi-structured interview data because people can apply the same code to different parts of a conversation [ 3 ]. The interviews were conducted under the same minimal risk IRB as the survey.

As HCI researchers, we designed our study to inform the design of menstrual cycle tracking technology through the lens of personal informatics.

Our research methods were designed with a bias toward understanding how women currently use technology to track. Women often track their menstrual cycle through non-technological methods or in their heads, and some do not formally track at all.

The demographic makeup was heavily influenced by the research team's social networks and the Reddit population. Although we focus on broad implications for menstrual tracking, substantial care must be taken when applying our findings to understanding tracking by women in cultures and ethnic groups underrepresented in our study. Future work is necessary to understand the challenges, motivations, and methods of tracking of women from other cultures, education levels, and economic statuses.

The keywords we selected when searching for apps led us to examine apps focused on period tracking rather than fertility and pregnancy. Many apps specifically aim to help women track factors important to becoming pregnant.

We did not specifically investigate how women use these apps, as we were interested in the lived experience of menstrual cycle tracking. However, many apps that are described or marketed as period trackers prominently include fertility and pregnancy features.

We surfaced five reasons women track their menstrual cycles. Women track to: 1 be aware of how their body is doing, 2 understand their body's reactions to different phases of their cycle, 3 be prepared, 4 become pregnant, and 5 inform conversations with healthcare providers.

Participants were typically motivated by multiple factors. Survey respondents often tracked their menstrual cycles to understand their body's physical and emotional reactions at different phases of their menstrual cycle, and to verify and predict their body's response.

Recording menstrual cycles